When this column appears in the newspaper on civic election day, I’ll yet to know who will be mayor or our councillor.
But I do know my king… or, rather, khan. Styxx the greyhound, who reigns supreme in our Wolseley home, has a penchant for visiting yurts.
These circular, wood-lattice-and-fabric-walled, conical-topped dwellings are most commonly associated with Mongolia, not just with historic khans but, today, as home to over half that country’s population. There, the structure is called a “ger.” (“Yurt” is a term from Russia.) Yurts, too, can be rented at 10 Manitoba provincial parks. Two to four yurts per park are allocated for dogs, cats and their families.
For three years now, Styxx has holidayed at Spruce Woods (Yurt 9, in leafy forest); this year and last, at Camp Morton (in the lake-facing, cliff-hugging Yurt 1); also this year, at Tulabi Falls in Nopiming Provincial Park (Yurt 5, overlooking a loon-haunted marsh). Every yurt is nestled in its own distinct enclave. Nearby are ample walking trails.
Styxx enjoys the accommodations’ uniformity and quality. All the yurts (at least, all he’s seen), are handmade by the Colorado Yurt Company of Montrose, Colo. They have a 16-foot diameter floor plate and seemingly towering ceiling. There’s an outdoor deck with countertop where his subjects prepare his steaks, using the barbecue unit they must bring. There is a picnic table and fire pit.
Each yurt is replete with knotty white pine furnishings by Pioneer Handcrafted Log Furniture of Grunthal, Man. including a bunk bed, futon frame (with futon), a table and four chairs. Yurters must supply sleeping bags and linens.
Styxx’s dad and I can attest to the authenticity of the yurt structures. In 2007 BS (Before Styxx), when the future king was but a pup training for the Ohio racing circuit, we trekked the Gobi Desert, staying in Mongolian gers. In Manitoba, they are a steal at $56.50 nightly for a minimum of two nights (maximum 14), with no extra cost for your esteemed pelted one (or two). A park vehicle permit is needed — $40 annually, $5 daily, or $12 for three consecutive days.
The yurts have electricity and a heater that Styxx found effective during two sojourns this September, when nighttime temperatures dropped near zero. Two yurt locations were in operation until two weeks ago, Thanksgiving weekend.
The 2019 yurting season will be open for reservations around early April.
When? See gov.mb.ca/sd/parks or, in Winnipeg, phone (204)-948-3333.

Gail Perry is a community correspondent for Wolseley. She can be reached at: gailperry.writer@gmail.com

When this column appears in the newspaper on civic election day, I’ll yet to know who will be mayor or our councillor.

But I do know my king… or, rather, khan. Styxx the greyhound, who reigns supreme in our Wolseley home, has a penchant for visiting yurts.

These circular, wood-lattice-and-fabric-walled, conical-topped dwellings are most commonly associated with Mongolia, not just with historic khans but, today, as home to over half that country’s population. There, the structure is called a “ger.” (“Yurt” is a term from Russia.) Yurts, too, can be rented at 10 Manitoba provincial parks. Two to four yurts per park are allocated for dogs, cats and their families.

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When this column appears in the newspaper on civic election day, I’ll yet to know who will be mayor or our councillor.

But I do know my king… or, rather, khan. Styxx the greyhound, who reigns supreme in our Wolseley home, has a penchant for visiting yurts. 

These circular, wood-lattice-and-fabric-walled, conical-topped dwellings are most commonly associated with Mongolia, not just with historic khans but, today, as home to over half that country’s population. There, the structure is called a “ger.” (“Yurt” is a term from Russia.) Yurts, too, can be rented at 10 Manitoba provincial parks. Two to four yurts per park are allocated for dogs, cats and their families.  

For three years now, Styxx has holidayed at Spruce Woods (Yurt 9, in leafy forest); this year and last, at Camp Morton (in the lake-facing, cliff-hugging Yurt 1); also this year, at Tulabi Falls in Nopiming Provincial Park (Yurt 5, overlooking a loon-haunted marsh). Every yurt is nestled in its own distinct enclave. Nearby are ample walking trails. 

Styxx enjoys the accommodations’ uniformity and quality. All the yurts (at least, all he’s seen), are handmade by the Colorado Yurt Company of Montrose, Colo. They have a 16-foot diameter floor plate and seemingly towering ceiling. There’s an outdoor deck with countertop where his subjects prepare his steaks, using the barbecue unit they must bring. There is a picnic table and fire pit.

Each yurt is replete with knotty white pine furnishings by Pioneer Handcrafted Log Furniture of Grunthal, Man. including a bunk bed, futon frame (with futon), a table and four chairs. Yurters must supply sleeping bags and linens.

Styxx’s dad and I can attest to the authenticity of the yurt structures. In 2007 BS (Before Styxx), when the future king was but a pup training for the Ohio racing circuit, we trekked the Gobi Desert, staying in Mongolian gers. In Manitoba, they are a steal at $56.50 nightly for a minimum of two nights (maximum 14), with no extra cost for your esteemed pelted one (or two). A park vehicle permit is needed — $40 annually, $5 daily, or $12 for three consecutive days.

The yurts have electricity and a heater that Styxx found effective during two sojourns this September, when nighttime temperatures dropped near zero. Two yurt locations were in operation until two weeks ago, Thanksgiving weekend.

The 2019 yurting season will be open for reservations around early April. 

When? See gov.mb.ca/sd/parks or, in Winnipeg, phone (204)-948-3333.

 

Gail Perry is a community correspondent for Wolseley. She can be reached at: gailperry.writer@gmail.com

When this column appears in the newspaper on civic election day, I’ll yet to know who will be mayor or our councillor.



Wolseley hound Styxx Perry-Firman inside his holiday home, his castle — a yurt at Spruce Woods Provincial Park.

SUPPLIED PHOTO BY DAVID FIRMAN

Wolseley hound Styxx Perry-Firman inside his holiday home, his castle — a yurt at Spruce Woods Provincial Park.

But I do know my king… or, rather, khan. Styxx the greyhound, who reigns supreme in our Wolseley home, has a penchant for visiting yurts. 

These circular, wood-lattice-and-fabric-walled, conical-topped dwellings are most commonly associated with Mongolia, not just with historic khans but, today, as home to over half that country’s population. There, the structure is called a “ger.” (“Yurt” is a term from Russia.) Yurts, too, can be rented at 10 Manitoba provincial parks. Two to four yurts per park are allocated for dogs, cats and their families.  

For three years now, Styxx has holidayed at Spruce Woods (Yurt 9, in leafy forest); this year and last, at Camp Morton (in the lake-facing, cliff-hugging Yurt 1); also this year, at Tulabi Falls in Nopiming Provincial Park (Yurt 5, overlooking a loon-haunted marsh). Every yurt is nestled in its own distinct enclave. Nearby are ample walking trails. 

Styxx enjoys the accommodations’ uniformity and quality. All the yurts (at least, all he’s seen), are handmade by the Colorado Yurt Company of Montrose, Colo. They have a 16-foot diameter floor plate and seemingly towering ceiling. There’s an outdoor deck with countertop where his subjects prepare his steaks, using the barbecue unit they must bring. There is a picnic table and fire pit.

Each yurt is replete with knotty white pine furnishings by Pioneer Handcrafted Log Furniture of Grunthal, Man. including a bunk bed, futon frame (with futon), a table and four chairs. Yurters must supply sleeping bags and linens.

Styxx’s dad and I can attest to the authenticity of the yurt structures. In 2007 BS (Before Styxx), when the future king was but a pup training for the Ohio racing circuit, we trekked the Gobi Desert, staying in Mongolian gers. In Manitoba, they are a steal at $56.50 nightly for a minimum of two nights (maximum 14), with no extra cost for your esteemed pelted one (or two). A park vehicle permit is needed — $40 annually, $5 daily, or $12 for three consecutive days.

The yurts have electricity and a heater that Styxx found effective during two sojourns this September, when nighttime temperatures dropped near zero. Two yurt locations were in operation until two weeks ago, Thanksgiving weekend.

The 2019 yurting season will be open for reservations around early April. 

When? See gov.mb.ca/sd/parks or, in Winnipeg, phone (204)-948-3333.

Gail Perry is a community correspondent for Wolseley. She can be reached at: gailperry.writer@gmail.com

Gail Perry

Gail Perry
Wolseley community correspondent

Gail Perry is a community correspondent for Wolseley.

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